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Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force visits basic military training

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hite provides Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force Dr.Jamie Morin an orientation of the Air Force Basic Military Training campus July 30, 2012, at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. During a visit to San Antonio, Morin met with BMT officials, toured trainee living quarters, and talked with current trainees.  Hite is a military
training instructor who has earned "Blue Rope" status, an honor bestowed on the top 10 percent of military training instructors at BMT.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Alan W. Boedeker)

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hite provides Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force Dr.Jamie Morin an orientation of the Air Force Basic Military Training campus July 30, 2012, at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. During a visit to San Antonio, Morin met with BMT officials, toured trainee living quarters, and talked with current trainees. Hite is a military training instructor who has earned "Blue Rope" status, an honor bestowed on the top 10 percent of military training instructors at BMT. (U.S. Air Force photo/Alan W. Boedeker)

8/1/2012 -- JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO -- LACKLAND, Texas (AFNS) -- Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force Dr. Jamie Morin visited with Air Force basic military training officials and trainees here July 30.

During a trip to San Antonio, Morin met with the 37th Training Wing leadership and toured the BMT campus.

In June, Gen. Edward A. Rice Jr., Air Education and Training Command commander, appointed Maj. Gen. Margaret H. Woodward to lead a command-directed investigation into BMT and technical training throughout the command following reports of misconduct by some military training instructors at BMT.

"Sexual assault is a serious crime and is deeply corrosive to military readiness," Morin said. "It is all the more so at Basic Military Training, which is foundational to everything our Air Force does. The men and women entrusted with molding civilians into Airmen must maintain the highest standards of professionalism in discharging their duties--both in how they treat trainees and how they handle reports of mistreatment.

"While the vast majority serve with honor, those who have betrayed the sacred trust we place in them will be held to the most stringent levels of accountability," he continued. "I know that Gen. Ed Rice and Maj. Gen. Margaret Woodward will continue aggressively investigating these crimes and will work with senior Air Force leadership to take all necessary steps."