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AF selects MTI of the year: Selection surprises BMT instructor

Tech. Sgt. Brian Fisher, an instructor at the Military Training Instructor School, is the Air Force’s outstanding basic military instructor of the year for 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo/Robbin Cresswell)

Tech. Sgt. Brian Fisher, an instructor at the Military Training Instructor School, is the Air Force’s outstanding basic military instructor of the year for 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo/Robbin Cresswell)

6/14/2012 -- 6/14/2012 - JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas -- When Tech. Sgt. Brian Fisher heard his name called as the 2011 Air Force Military Training Instructor of the Year, it took him by surprise.

"Shocked," said Fisher about his reaction to being selected for the award at the Air Education and Training Command Outstanding Airman of the Year awards banquet, held at nearby Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph recently.

"It's a tough competition. You go up against the best MTIs and any one of them could have won it.

"When they called my name, it was more of a shock just because of the caliber of instructors you're up against," he said.

To Senior Master Sgt. Laroy Newhouse, former training superintendent at the 322nd Training Squadron, and Fisher's former supervisor in 2011, the selection came as no surprise.

"Sergeant Fisher was a unanimous choice as our Blue Rope of the Year in the 322nd," said Newhouse. "He definitely stood out. He was a role model and our 'go-to' guy.

"He adapts to any situation, and that is why he deserves to be MTI of the Year," Newhouse added.

During the award year, Fisher was selected No. 1 out of 50 instructors in the squadron.
He served as NCO in charge of military drill and ceremonies for the unit, and was also a distinguished NCO Academy graduate.

Fisher also helped raise $50,000 for the Combined Federal Campaign, and served as the squadron's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response representative.

Between his squadron activities, Fisher also earned 21 credit hours toward a social and criminal justice degree, making the Dean's List with a 4.0 average.

Last spring, Fisher was part of an Air Force MTI and Army drill sergeant exchange program that gave both services an opportunity to evaluate basic training processes from each other's perspectives.

The NCOs, subject matter experts from both the services, expect to apply what they've learned to help enhance the development of future military leaders.

"Fisher was our squadron leadership's premier choice to help mentor (Army Staff Sgt. David Peters) during the Air Force and Army exchange program," Newhouse said.

With Fisher serving as Peters' MTI team instructor/trainer, their basic training flight graduated in the top 10 percent of its class.

An 11-year veteran, Fisher arrived at JBSA-Lackland in June 2009.

He spent more than two years as an MTI, and recently became an instructor at the MTI school, where they train the trainers.

While he enjoys teaching at the school, Fisher admits it wouldn't take much to have him return to his former job as an MTI.

"I'd go back in a minute," Fisher said. "I became an MTI to develop and mentor our newest Airmen. Seeing the potential we send out every 8.5 weeks into the U.S. Air Force - you just can't imagine that. That's the most amazing thing we do here as MTIs."