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Military and Family Life Counselors support service members

With the rise of suicides in the military community, leadership and mental health providers are pondering what they can do to address the situation.

With the rise of suicides in the military community, leadership and mental health providers are pondering what they can do to address the situation. One of the resources offered to help combat the stressors that affect mental health to active duty members and their family is the Military and Family Life Counseling program. (Courtesy photo)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA, --

With the rise of suicides in the military community, leadership and mental health providers are pondering what they can do to address the situation.

One of the resources offered to help combat the stressors that affect mental health to active duty members and their family is the Military and Family Life Counseling program.

“We are here to listen and if someone just needs to talk about their daily stressors,” said Andrea Mallory, 33rd Fighter Wing Military and Family Life Counselor. “Each of us have a degree in either mental health, social work or psychology, so we are equipped to help talk through any problems someone may be experiencing.”

Counseling services provided by the Military and Family Life Counselors are comprised of helping with life skills, unique military issues and family problems.

“We are an additional resource of highly-qualified professionals to the existing military support services like Mental Health and the Airman and Family Readiness Center,” said Mallory.

The Military and Family Life Counseling Program offers free short-term, non-medical counseling through one-on-one, couple, family and group counseling.

“Is it free? Do I need to bring my insurance card? That’s the most common question I get about our services,” said Mallory. “Our services are all free to any service member and their immediate family.”

These services are available at a Military and Family Life Counselor office or a counselor can meet you at most places on and off base.

Anything discussed with one of the counselors is confidential, except for duty to warn of suspected family maltreatment, including, domestic violence, child abuse or neglect), harm to self or others, and illegal activity.

“I don’t take any personal identification information,” said Mallory. “I just talk to people, so it will not affect your career, deployment or job.”